Off the top of my head I can think of 3 big names that have recently been recruited to work for Microsoft.
 
Scott Hanselman
Rob Connery
Phil Haack

Here is a quick run down of what each of them is known for (in case you didn't already know).

Scott Hanselman is known, in my opinion, most for his talk show that he does called Hanselminutes.  Hanselminutes is a weekly .NET related podcast where Scott will talk about and have guests come on to talk about various .NET topics.

Rob Connery is known for his work on SubSonic which is a super easy to use DAL that you basically drag and drop into your app and have up in running in little to no time.  Rob is constantly working on SubSonic, adding new features, integrating it with others, etc.  He even recently made SubSonic work with LOLCat (if you don't know what LOLCat is, check it out, you'll find it amusing).

Phil Haack, like Scott Hanselman is known for all around .NET knowledge, SubText (the blog engine that i am writing this on) and Head of Koders (a source code search engine).

So what they hell are they working on at Microsoft you might ask?

Scott H is working on the new MVC framework that has just been released in early beta first shown at the ALT.NET conference.  Long story short, Microsoft is answering the wishes of MANY MVC users whom have turned to .NET MVC frameworks like MonoRail for all their MVC needs.  Microsofts MVC framework completely throws away the existing way ASP.NET pages are rendered and allows for better integration for unit testing which is all the buzz these days.

Rob Connery is now being payed to work full-time on SubSonic instead of just every other unpaid minute of his day.  How cool is that?  You make this awesome DAL component that is making everyones programming lives easier, and then Microsoft comes after you and pays you to work on it full-time?  I think they call that "the dream".

Phil Haack I believe is work along with Scott H on the MVC framework as well as having the title "Senior Program Manager on the ASP.NET team", which means he'll be helping to shape things to come in ASP.NET


I think its great that Microsoft is gobbling up these big .NET names because they are the names out there that people know of and respect.  These are the guys that were already doing GREAT things with what .NET offered and now they are going to help make ASP.NET that much better.  So i am really looking forward to the next few years with .NET because they are probably going to make my job much easier....and frankly I don't like working to hard so its a welcome addition!

I'm wondering when a few other names are going to join forces with Microsoft?  My next guess is that Miguel de Icaza might be next, but I think its going to be hard for Microsoft to land him.

So besides the MVC framework, what does Microsoft have next up its sleeve?  Any guesses?

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Tony Testa posted on October 5, 2007 00:00

Over at Scott Guthrie's blog, he announced that with the release of .NET 3.5/VS2008 and going forward, developers will have access to the source code for the .NET libraries!

This is pretty damn cool because it's going to allow us, as developers, to debug/step into the source code for the .NET libraries and find out how things work underneath.  With seeing how things work underneath, we'll be able to built better, clearner, faster applications because we'll have a better understanding of where to improve/refactor our code.

I strongly encourge you to check out Scott's blog post about this, it has a good example of the DataBind() method and how you can step into it to see how it works.

*** The same can be done using Reflector, but the source code will come with comments and such which may help you out.


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Dino Esposito has a GREAT AJAX architecture article in the September 2007 issue of MSDN magazine.  It's a multiple part article and Part 1 goes into the basics of ASP.NET AJAX.
Whats really noteworthy in this article is that Dino drills down and shows you whats going on behind the scenes with an partial page request using ASP.NET AJAX and shows you some optimization tweaks you can make yourself to help performance a bit.

At the last talk I gave on ASP.NET AJAX,  I had put in place the groundwork for people to see that ASP.NET AJAX makes incorporating AJAX into your existing .NET 2.0 web apps, but that simplicity comes at a price.  One audience member put that together and asked if a partial-page request goes through the full page lifecycle and unfortunately I had to let him know that it does.  This series of articles should help show how you can optimize the performance.

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