First off if you don’t know what jQuery is by now then this post probably won’t make a lot of sense to you, so in that case visit jQuery’s website and get back to me when your a web 2.0 expert.

It was just announced that Microsoft is going to host their MS Ajax javascript libraries and jQuery libraries for you on their CDN servers.  Check out Scott Gu’s post on the matter but to make a long story short, MS has “strategically” placed servers all over the world that will serve up the MS Ajax and jQuery libraries for you.  All you have to do is include your <script src=”{insert js library favorite flavor}.js”> in your HTML and have it point to the appropriate JS file on Microsoft’s CDN server(s).  Check out all the versions it supports on the Asp.Net AJAX CDN site.

This is obviously pretty cool because chances are Microsoft’s servers will have better uptime than your own so you can pretty much rely on that JS file always being there.  In addition, its free for anyone to use, commercial or non-commercial.

You may be thinking to yourself “wow, that’s so cool of Microsoft, they are really thinking of the little guy!”, which isn’t a COMPLETELY wrong statement, but did you know that Google has been doing the same thing for quite awhile now?

If you check out jQuery’s website, the jQuery authors themselves even recommend grabbing jQuery from google’s site, check out How jQuery works and look at the “Complete Example” section near the top.

Also, if your interested, have a look at Google’s page and see what other js libs they host for you (hint: jQuery, Prototype, Yahoo YUI, Dojo, script.aculo.us).

So, how do I leverage either the MS or Google CDN for my jQuery js files?  Simple! see below

Google: <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
 
or
 
MS: <script src="http://ajax.microsoft.com/ajax/jquery/jquery-1.3.2.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

*** If your asking yourself what is the difference between “jquery.min.js” and “jquery.js” the answer is that the “min” means that the js file is compressed meaning it has whitespace removed, making it significantly smaller resulting in less download size for your users which results in your sites faster page loads.

 

Great! Now your going to go and change all your <script> tags in all your projects to use either the MS or Google CDN version of jQuery, right?!?!?!?!  Now hold up there partner!! Take a step back and think about this and what it means to your app and where your app lives.

Ask yourself these questions:

Is your app on the internet?

Then I would say you should probably be using of the two CDN’s for your jQuery libraries because your app is internet facing and the js files will be served up quicker to your users and your pages will load faster.

Is your app an intranet app?

Then take a step back and think this one out logically.  What server is going to serve up the jQuery libraries faster?  Google? No!  Microsoft? No!  A server on the intranet? BINGO!  A server on your intranet more than likely serve up the js files a hell of a lot faster than a users PC having to call out to Google or MS to get the js files.  (Yes, a caching server may help matters)

For all you SharePoint junkies out there like me the two questions above are VERY relevant.  Chances are the majority of SharePoint sites your working on are going to be intranet facing sites and therefore your still better off hosting the js libraries yourself.  BUT, if your working on a SharePoint INTERNET facing site, then one of these CDN’s should be something you seriously consider because SharePoint takes long enough to load a page so any increase in page load times you can make will go a long way.

Moral of the story time.  Take a second and think to yourself before just reading a post out on the interwebs and implementing it.  Think about the effects it will have on your app and be sure to take into account YOUR environment.


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tony testa posted on September 4, 2009 00:48

stsadm -o extendvs -url "http://winsvr2008base:90" -ownerlogin "winsvr2008base\administrator" -owneremail "contentowneremail@yourdomain.com" –exclusivelyusentlm -apidname "SharePoint - SSP" -apidtype configurableid -apidlogin "winsvr2008base\administrator" -apidpwd P@ssw0rd -description "SharePoint - SSP" -databasename "SharePoint_SSP_Content"

 

above does not work

 

stsadm -o extendvs -url "http://winsvr2008base:90" -ownerlogin "winsvr2008base\administrator" -owneremail "contentowneremail@yourdomain.com" -exclusivelyusentlm -databasename "SharePoint_SSP_Content" -description "SharePoint - SSP" -apidname "SharePoint - SSP" -apidtype configurableid -apidlogin  winsvr2008base\administrator -apidpwd P@ssw0rd

 

 

the above works…..same info, just different order of the command line args….i don’t get it.  When I get some time I’ll open up reflector and dig into the STSADM.EXE and see if I can figure out what might be happening.


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tony testa posted on September 4, 2009 00:45

I’ll fully admit that this is a dump from a MS KB page, but I can’t remember how many times I’ve had to search for this, so I figured I’d make a blog posting more for myself so that I can just come back to my own blog and know the info is here.

 

How to determine which version of SQL Server 2008 is running
To determine which version of Microsoft SQL Server 2008 is running, connect to SQL Server 2008 by using SQL Server Management Studio, and then run the following Transact-SQL statement.

SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('productversion'), SERVERPROPERTY ('productlevel'), SERVERPROPERTY ('edition')

The following results are returned:

  • The product version (for example, 10.0.1600.22)
  • The product level (for example, RTM)
  • The edition (for example, Enterprise)
For example, the results resemble the following.

Collapse this tableExpand this table

10.0.1600.22
RTM
Enterprise Edition

The following table lists the Sqlservr.exe version number.

Collapse this tableExpand this table

Release
Sqlservr.exe

RTM
2007.100.1600.0

SQL Server 2008 Service Pack 1
2007.100.2531.0

 

How to determine which version of SQL Server 2005 is running
To determine which version of Microsoft SQL Server 2005 is running, connect to SQL Server 2005 by using SQL Server Management Studio, and then run the following Transact-SQL statement.

SELECT  SERVERPROPERTY('productversion'), SERVERPROPERTY ('productlevel'), SERVERPROPERTY ('edition')

The following results are returned:

  • The product version (for example, 9.00.1399.06)
  • The product level (for example, RTM)
  • The edition (for example, Enterprise Edition)
For example, the results resemble the following.

Collapse this tableExpand this table

9.00.1399.06
RTM
Enterprise Edition

The following table lists the Sqlservr.exe version number.

Collapse this tableExpand this table

Release
Sqlservr.exe

RTM
2005.90.1399

SQL Server 2005 Service Pack 1
2005.90.2047

SQL Server 2005 Service Pack 2
2005.90.3042

SQL Server 2005 Service Pack 3
2005.90.4035

 

How to determine which version of SQL Server 2000 is running
To determine which version of SQL Server 2000 is running, connect to SQL Server 2000 by using Query Analyzer, and then run the following code.

SELECT  SERVERPROPERTY('productversion'), SERVERPROPERTY ('productlevel'), SERVERPROPERTY ('edition')

The following results are returned:

  • The product version (for example, 8.00.534)
  • The product level (for example, "RTM" or "SP2")
  • The edition (for example, "Standard Edition"). For example, the results resemble the following:
    8.00.534 SP2 Standard Edition
The following table lists the Sqlservr.exe version number.

Collapse this tableExpand this table

Release
Sqlservr.exe

RTM
2000.80.194.0

SQL Server 2000 SP1
2000.80.384.0

SQL Server 2000 SP2
2000.80.534.0

SQL Server 2000 SP3
2000.80.760.0

SQL Server 2000 SP3a
2000.80.760.0

SQL Server 2000 SP4
2000.8.00.2039

 

How to determine which version of SQL Server 7.0 is running
To determine which version of SQL Server 7.0 is running, connect to SQL Server 7.0 by using Query Analyzer, and then run the following code.

SELECT @@VERSION

The results resemble the following:

Microsoft SQL Server  7.00 - 7.00.623 (Intel X86)
        Nov 27 1998 22:20:07
        Copyright (c) 1988-1998 Microsoft Corporation
        Desktop Edition on Windows NT 5.1 (Build 2600: )

Note In this example, the version number is 7.00.623.
Use the version number in the following table to identify the product or service pack level.

Collapse this tableExpand this table

Version Number
Service Pack

7.00.1063
SQL Server 7.0 Service Pack 4 (SP4)

7.00.961
SQL Server 7.0 Service Pack 3 (SP3)

7.00.842
SQL Server 7.0 Service Pack 2 (SP2)

7.00.699
SQL Server 7.0 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

7.00.623
SQL Server 7.0 RTM (Release To Manufacturing)

If the version number that is reported by @@VERSION is not listed in this table, SQL Server is running with a hotfix or a security update build. For example, if @@VERSION reports a version number of 7.00.859, you are running SQL Server 7.0 SP2 with a hotfix installed. The version number increases with each new version of the Sqlservr.exe executable file. See to the Readme.txt file for your hotfix or security update for more information.

 

How to determine which version of SQL Server 6.5 is running
To determine which version of Microsoft SQL Server 6.5 is running, connect to SQL Server 6.5 by using Isql_w, and then run the following code.

SELECT @@VERSION

Use the version number in the following table to identify the product or service pack level.

Collapse this tableExpand this table

Version Number
Service Pack

6.50.479
SQL Server 6.5 Service Pack 5a (SP5a) Update

6.50.416
SQL Server 6.5 Service Pack 5a (SP5a)

6.50.415
SQL Server 6.5 Service Pack 5 (SP5)

6.50.281
SQL Server 6.5 Service Pack 4 (SP4)

6.50.258
SQL Server 6.5 Service Pack 3 (SP3)

6.50.240
SQL Server 6.5 Service Pack 2 (SP2)

6.50.213
SQL Server 6.5 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

6.50.201
SQL Server 6.5 RTM

If the version number that is reported by @@VERSION is not listed in this table, SQL Server is running with a hotfix or a security update build. The version number increases with each new version of the Sqlservr.exe executable file. See to the Readme.txt file for your hotfix or security update for more information.

 

How to determine which edition of SQL Server is running
If you are not sure about what edition of SQL Server that you are running, the last line of output that is returned by @@VERSION reports the edition to which you have connected. The example that is used in this article is the Standard Edition of SQL Server 2000 on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: Service Pack 2).
Note The build and service pack information that is provided earlier is for the operating system, not for SQL Server.
Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: Service Pack 2)

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Disclaimer
The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in anyway.

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